52 Lime Street, London: Engineering the Developing Vernacular of the City of London

Dale Sinclair
Director
AECOM, London

Over the last 50 years the City of London has been the home to an evolving cluster of tall buildings. Their form has been moulded by the specific requirements of the people who work in that place and the way that they work together. They respond to the need of the financial and legal services firms that gather there. Their aesthetic, massing and urbanism has been shaped it, and also by strong policy from the local Planning Authority. These buildings form a New Vernacular.

The City has sustained itself since Roman times but if it is to continue to thrive until 2069 and beyond the New Vernacular must develop. CO2 emissions must be reduced and eventually eliminated, both in use and in construction.

52 Lime Street cannot make the boast of being a Zero Carbon tall building. It does, however, use cutting edge technologies to minimise CO2 emissions while creating an attractive, human centred workplace. Building massing and efficient MEP design achieve an operational carbon saving of over 25%. This presentation, however, will focus on the savings in embodied carbon in the building structure.

Computational design reduced eCO2 emission from the steel frame by 1300t.

The use of viscous damper elements in the stability system reduced eCO2 emissions by 4700t.

Prestressing of the core reduced eCO2 emissions by 1000t and increased the lettable area of the building by 5000sqf.

This elegant, glassy, 38 storey office building is the latest addition to the City of London’s tall building vernacular. The structural strategies that this presentation describes are the next step along the road to a low carbon future.

Accompanying PowerPoint Presentation